preach


preach
01. The minister [preached] a sermon on the dangers of desire.
02. The government has been aggressively [preaching] the benefits of safe sex in an effort to stop the spread of AIDS.
03. My mother is always [preaching] to me that girls shouldn't play rough sports and stuff like that, but I just ignore her.
04. "You will burn in hell for eternity if you do not repent your sins!" cried the [preacher].
05. The Bible says, "And he said unto them, Go ye into all the world, and [preach] the gospel to every creature."
06. Fitness advocates [preach] the value of regular, vigorous exercise.
07. My dad never listens to me. All he does is [preach] to me about what he thinks I should do with my life.
08. The founder of Sikhism [preached] that women were worthy of praise, and equal to men.
09. The President continues to [preach] caution in reacting to the news of the terrorist threats.
10. Archbishop Oscar Romero of El Salvador was murdered for [preaching] against the violent repression of his countrymen.
11. Karl Marx believed that the social principles of Christianity [preach] the necessity of a ruling and oppressed class.
12. A recent study suggests that many peole in this country ignore the Pope as irrelevant when he [preaches] on individual and public morality.
13. A traditional proverb advises us, "Practice what you [preach]."
14. Ralph Waldo Emerson once said, "I like the silent church before the service begins better than any [preaching]."
15. Benjamin Franklin once observed that none [preaches] better than the ant, and she says nothing.
16. Harry Emerson Fosdick once claimed that [preaching] is personal counseling on a group basis.

Grammatical examples in English. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • preach — preach·able; preach·er; preach·er·less; preach·er·ly; preach·er·ship; preach·ifi·ca·tion; preach·ify; preach·i·ly; preach·i·ness; preach·ment; un·preach; preach; preach·ing·ly; …   English syllables

  • preach — [ pritʃ ] verb * 1. ) intransitive or transitive to talk about a religious subject at a religious meeting, especially in church: preach a sermon: The Reverend Hugh McKeag preached the sermon. preach to: That afternoon he preached to three… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • Preach — Preach, v. t. 1. To proclaim by public discourse; to utter in a sermon or a formal religious harangue. [1913 Webster] That Cristes gospel truly wolde preche. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] The Lord hath anointed me to preach good tidings unto the meek.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • preach — [pri:tʃ] v [Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin: prechier, from Late Latin praedicare, from Latin dicare to say publicly ] 1.) [I and T] to talk about a religious subject in a public place, especially in a church during a service preach to ▪… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • preach´i|ly — preach|y «PREE chee», adjective, preach|i|er, preach|i|est. Informal. 1. inclined to preach: »Of the 1,400 odd books…many, of course, are teachy, preachy pills of moralism (Newsweek) …   Useful english dictionary

  • preach|y — «PREE chee», adjective, preach|i|er, preach|i|est. Informal. 1. inclined to preach: »Of the 1,400 odd books…many, of course, are teachy, preachy pills of moralism (Newsweek) …   Useful english dictionary

  • Preach — Preach, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Preached}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Preaching}.] [OE. prechen, OF. preechier, F. pr[^e]cher, fr. L. praedicare to cry in public, to proclaim; prae before + dicare to make known, dicere to say; or perhaps from (assumed) LL.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Preach — Preach, n. [Cf. F. pr[^e]che, fr. pr[^e]cher. See {Preach}, v.] A religious discourse. [Obs.] Hooker. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • preach — (v.) late O.E. predician, a loan word from Church Latin, reborrowed 12c. as preachen, from O.Fr. prechier (11c.), from L.L. predicare to proclaim publicly, announce (in Medieval Latin to preach ), from L. prae before (see PRE (Cf. pre )) + dicare …   Etymology dictionary

  • preach — [v1] speak publicly about beliefs address, deliver, deliver sermon, evangelize, exhort, give sermon, homilize, inform, minister, mission, missionary, orate, prophesy, pulpiteer, sermonize, talk, teach; concepts 51,285,367 preach [v2] lecture,… …   New thesaurus

  • preach — ► VERB 1) deliver a religious address to an assembled group of people. 2) earnestly advocate (a principle). 3) (preach at) give moral advice to (someone) in a self righteous way. DERIVATIVES preacher noun. ORIGIN Old French prechier, from Latin… …   English terms dictionary


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.